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Home → car accidents → Crash deaths high among subcompacts and sports cars

Crash deaths high among subcompacts and sports cars

| May 27, 2020 | car accidents

iSeeCars.com has made an analysis of fatal car crash rates among vehicles with a 2013-2017 model year. On average, 2.6 of these vehicles were in a fatal accident per billion vehicle miles. Yet the rate was 4.5 for subcompact cars and 4.6 for sports cars, making these the two deadliest vehicle types. Residents of Indiana may want to know more.

The automotive research firm went on to compile a list of 14 vehicles with a fatal crash rate that was at least double the 2.6 average. At the bottom of the list were the Hyundai Veloster Turbo and Nissan Versa Note, both 5.2, while at the top was the subcompact Mitsubishi Mirage with 10.2. After that came the Chevrolet Corvette with 9.8, Honda Fit with 7.7 and Kia Forte with 7.4.

Perhaps it’s not surprising that sports cars have such a high fatal crash rate, designed as they are for speed and quick acceleration. Both sports cars and subcompacts have relatively few active safety features, too, though the list came with some exceptions.

Another noteworthy find was how many of the vehicles received four- or five-star safety ratings from NHTSA. At least two were designated as IIHS Top Safety Picks, yet quite a few failed certain IIHS crash tests, especially the driver-side small overlap frontal test.

Victims of car accidents may have suffered severe injuries because their own vehicle failed to offer much protection. If they were not to blame for their injuries, they may be compensated for their losses, both monetary and non-monetary, by filing a claim against the other driver. Indiana follows a modified comparative fault rule, so even those partially to blame can be eligible for damages. Whatever their situation, victims may want a lawyer to offer a case assessment.