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Parents concerned about teens riding with distracted drivers

| Oct 3, 2019 | car accidents

Indiana parents always want their children to be safe when they reach their teen years and are given the responsibilities inherent with getting a driver’s license. Part of that is riding with other teens who are also new drivers. It is natural to be concerned about the dangers on the road. Many of these are due to teen behaviors behind the wheel including being distracted drivers. New research shows how concerned parents are with distraction and other possible risks. If there is a motor vehicle accident with injuries and fatalities, thinking about legal help is important.

In a new poll, more than 50 percent of parents across the nation admit they believe their teen has been a passenger in a vehicle with another teen who was distracted behind the wheel. While cellphones are considered the most prevalent source for distraction and was mentioned by 42 percent, there are others. That includes 46 percent who were fearful of loud music and 39 percent who believed other teens served as a distraction. Going beyond distraction, speeding was cited by 45 percent; drowsy driving by 14 percent; and impairment by 5 percent.

Still, one in three parents allowed their teens to ride with another teen at least two times per week. In the study, more than 900 people took part. They had a minimum of one child between 14 and 18.

Parents did say they took various steps to enhance safety. That includes not allowing their teen to ride with another teen when the weather was poor, after midnight or if the driver had experience limited to fewer than six months as a driver. Almost 50 percent said they did not want their kids riding with more than two teens, when it was dark and did not allow them to go on the highway.

Auto accidents are the most frequent reasons for teen fatalities. Despite attempts to encourage driver safety when they are new to the road as drivers or passengers, accidents can and will happen.